Category

Toledo

lower back injury in Toledo

What to Do After Suffering a Lower Back Injury

By | Ohio, Personal Injury, Toledo | No Comments

Lower back injuries are fairly common, but they can leave a person sidelined and unable to sit or stand. Many of our clients cannot return to work for months following a lower back injury, and their medical expenses are considerable.

Below, our personal injury attorney highlights the steps to take if you are suffering from lower back pain. When an accident has caused your injury, please contact Groth & Associates for a free consultation.

Immediately Rest

Many lower back injuries are caused by accidents, such as car wrecks or slip and fall accidents. Others might be caused by the job, in which case you should immediately stop working. Tell your boss that you are injured. Continued exertion only increases the risk that you will aggravate the back injury further.

Visit the Doctor

There are many different causes of lower back pain, and we do not encourage people to self-diagnose their injury. Instead, go to the doctor or hospital promptly and discuss your symptoms. Your doctor will also ask you questions to help understand how the injury happened.

Some of the more common causes of lower back pain include:

  • Sprain or strain
  • Herniated disc
  • Vertebral fracture
  • Degenerative disc disease
  • Infection
  • Narrowing of the spinal column (spinal stenosis)

The doctor might order an X-ray or MRI to take a look at what is going on in your lower back. A proper diagnosis is vital since you cannot receive adequate treatment without knowing the underlying condition.

Treat a Sprain or Strain with Ice

If you wrenched your back lifting something, you can treat it with ice packs at home to reduce swelling and pain. You might also use over-the-counter medications, like ibuprofen, to control inflammation and provide relief.

After a few days, your doctor might recommend introducing gentle stretching to regain flexibility in the area. If the pain does not subside after a week, you might have suffered a very serious injury and could require surgery.

Receive Conservative Treatment for a Lower Back Injury

Not every back injury requires surgery. Some respond to rehabilitation and other conservative treatment, such as steroid injections to reduce inflammation.

Physical therapy can help a person with a serious lower back injury reduce stress on the muscles and vertebrae. You might learn new ways of doing everyday tasks, such as lifting objects, so you do not aggravate your back condition. Often, a patient must learn to strengthen certain “core” muscles to compensate for any limitation in their back.

Undergo Surgery

Some lower back injuries are so serious that surgery is unavoidable. For example, a herniated disc might be so severe that a surgeon must remove the damaged tissue so it no longer puts pressure on nearby nerves. In some cases, vertebrae might need to be fused together to limit their range of movement.

Surgery has many complications, such as the risk of infection and long recovery times. Discuss your concerns with your doctor.

Our Personal Injury Lawyers Can Help

Whether you were injured on the job or in an accident, you might qualify for compensation. At Groth & Associates, we can discuss your case in a complimentary consultation if you call.

charged with a crime in Toledo

What Does it Mean to Be Charged with a Crime?

By | Criminal Defense, Ohio, Toledo | No Comments

When a person is charged with a crime in Ohio, they are no longer merely a suspect. A suspect is someone the government “thinks” might have committed a crime and could be the subject of an investigation. Crimes often have a long list of suspects, which the police try to winnow down using detective work.

But when the government “charges” someone with a crime, they are formally accusing them of being a criminal. Criminal charges are very serious, and the accused must obtain competent legal help, otherwise, they could very easily find themselves in jail. Many criminal cases are won or lost in the days following an arrest, so contact Groth & Associates today.

Being Arrested and Held

Although the government can arrest a suspect, they cannot hold them indefinitely. Instead, they typically need to present evidence to a judge in a preliminary hearing. The prosecutor can question witnesses and present physical evidence. The defendant can als0 cross-examine witnesses and present their own if they wish. The judge must find that there is enough evidence to justify holding the defendant.

After the hearing, the judge has many options:

  •         Hold the defendant to appear in court pending a grand jury indictment on the originally filed charges
  •         Find probable cause on a different charge supported by the evidence and hold the defendant to appear in court
  •         Find a probable cause to support a misdemeanor charge
  •         Order that the defendant be discharged from custody

Formal Indictment

Article 1 of the Ohio Constitution states that a person cannot stand trial for a felony unless they are indicted by a grand jury. This jury is composed of members of the community who receive evidence from the prosecutor. They deliberate and then decide whether to issue the indictment

Lower-level crimes might be charged by information or complaint and do not require an indictment. If you are charged with a misdemeanor offense, for example, the prosecutor does not necessarily need a grand jury to indict you.

Charging documents have many technical requirements, and some complaints or indictments are defective. A seasoned criminal defense attorney should always review a charging document to check whether the case can be dismissed due to a defect.

Defending Yourself

As soon as you are charged with a crime, you must begin building a defense. There is no confusion about the fact that the state believes you are guilty, and they will dedicate considerable resources to getting a conviction. Now is not the time to try and “talk your way” out of a charge, so there is no incentive to answer the police officer’s questions.

When the charges are serious, you might be held in jail awaiting trial or offered bail. It can be hard for a defendant to build a defense when their movement is restricted. This is just another reason to reach out to a criminal defense attorney.

At Groth & Associates, we have represented men and women charged with misdemeanor and felony offenses. You can contact us to schedule a confidential consultation with one of our lawyers.

injured at work in Toledo

In Ohio, What Constitutes a Work-Related Injury?

By | Ohio, Personal Injury, Toledo | No Comments

Workers’ compensation benefits provide critical support for those suffering from work-related injuries. Many of our clients can receive reasonable medical expenses, along with partial wage replacement benefits. But what qualifies as a “work-related injury” for purposes of the workers’ compensation law? Our Ohio workers’ compensation attorney provides an overview of the law.

Injuries at Work

This is perhaps the clearest example of a work-related injury. If you were injured while working at your place of employment, you should qualify for benefits.

Injuries might result from a sudden accident, such as a fall or an explosion. If the shelves in your office collapse and the contents fall on you, then you have suffered a work-related injury.

By contrast, other injuries take time to develop, such as repetitive stress injuries or occupational illnesses. For example, someone who develops cancer from inhaling toxic chemicals over the course of years has suffered an occupational illness and should qualify for benefits. The same is true of someone who developed carpal tunnel syndrome slowly over the years of punching numbers into a computer.

Injuries away from Work

Under ORC §4123(C), an injury qualifies for benefits if the worker suffers it “in the course of” and “arising out of” their employment. Under this standard, injuries sustained away from work might qualify. For example, many people travel for their jobs or attend business functions as a representative of their company. If you are working when you were injured, then your injuries are possibly work-related.

This is a fact-specific analysis. For example, we want to see whether you are reimbursed for travel expenses and whether your employer required you to travel. These facts help show that the time away from the office was work-related.

Traveling to and From Work

You typically cannot claim workers’ compensation benefits if you were injured driving to work or driving home when you have a fixed location for work. This is called the “coming and going” rule and it applies to those with “fixed-situs” jobs.

There are many factors to analyze with this type of claim. For example, do your work duties start only when you reach work? If so, then being injured while traveling to work does not qualify. Are you “on the clock” only when you reach a fixed location? If so, then the coming and going rule probably applies.

Pre-Existing Conditions

You might have been injured in an accident years ago, resulting in impairment. This pre-existing condition does not qualify as work-related. However, if your pre-existing condition was “substantially aggravated” on the job, then your injury is probably work-related.

For example, you might have herniated a disc while snowboarding three years ago. At work, you lift a heavy box and suddenly feel a pain in the same location, which makes it impossible for you to sit up or stand. Under these facts, your back injury is probably work-related.

Psychological Injuries

Generally, psychiatric conditions are excluded by the statute’s definition of an “injury.” However, there are exceptions, such as when the psychiatric condition develops out of an injury or occupational illness. Another exception covers psychiatric conditions that arise from forced sexual conduct, such as sexual assault at work.

Non-Covered Injuries

Some injuries are not covered by workers’ compensation. For example, any natural deterioration of an organ or body tissue does not qualify. Someone who naturally loses their eyesight has not been injured on the job.

An injury suffered when participating in fitness or recreational activity sponsored by an employer also does not qualify when the employee signs of a waiver.

Contact Us Today

Whether an injury qualifies for workers’ compensation benefits is not always easy. Groth & Associates can review your case and help you decide the right step to take. Give us a call to schedule a free consultation.

expungement in Toledo

How to File for Expungement in Ohio

By | Criminal Defense, Ohio, Toledo | No Comments

A criminal conviction can pop up at the most inconvenient time, such as when applying to the job of your dreams or when seeking an apartment. Many people are shocked that they need to disclose criminal records that are years, possibly decades, old.

Fortunately, many people can expunge their criminal histories in Ohio. This article explains how, but we encourage you to reach out to an Ohio expungement attorney for a consultation.

Check if You Can Expunge Your Conviction

Not all crimes are eligible. For example, you cannot expunge a conviction for sexual imposition, rape, sexual battery, public indecency, and other sex crimes. Felonies in the first-, second-, and third-degree cannot be expunged, either. Speak with an attorney if you have questions.

Satisfy the Waiting Period

Ohio law sets a waiting period before a person can apply for expungement. The amount of time will depend on whether you were convicted and the specific crime.

The clock does not begin to run until you have received a termination of the case or a final discharge. For example, you will need to complete all probation, pay all fines, and satisfy any restitution order.

Here are some sample waiting periods:

  • Unclassified misdemeanor: 1 year
  • Misdemeanor: 1 year from termination of the case
  • A single felony conviction: 3 years

A person can also expunge non-convictions, such as dismissals or acquittals, and there is no waiting period.

Obtain a Copy of Your Conviction

Visit the Clerk of Court where you were sentenced. Ask for a certified copy of “Judgment Order of Conviction.” You will have to pay a small fee. You cannot request expungement with a certified judgment.

Draft an Application

You need to draft an application asking the judge to expunge your record. Your attorney knows how to do this, but if you are representing yourself you should look for printed forms to complete. In Ohio, public libraries have fill-in-the-blank forms you can use. There are two forms you need:

  • Application for Sealing of a Criminal Record Pursuant to ORC §2953.32
  • Judgment Entry for Sealing

The “Application” will request information such as the charges and case numbers for the convictions you hope to expunge. You will also need the date of convictions and the date of termination.

The “Judgment Entry” is something the judge will sign at the hearing. However, you must provide the requested information in the appropriate lines.

Assemble the Packet

Attach the “Judgment Order of Conviction” to the “Application for Sealing of a Criminal Record.” You need 3 copies of this combined document. This is what you will file with the Clerk of Court.

Key: You are not filing the Judgment Entry for Sealing. Instead, you take that to the court hearing with you for the judge.

File at the Clerk of Court

Visit the Clerk of Court to file. The clerk should stamp all your copies and give one back to you. This is for your records.

You must pay a fee to file. Call ahead and ask the clerk for the amount and acceptable methods of payment. The amount of the fee can change over time. If you can’t afford the fee, you should complete a “Poverty Affidavit” at the clerk’s office.

Schedule a Hearing

The clerk should schedule a hearing date before the judge. Remember, you need the judge to sign off on your request only after he or she is convinced that you will not commit another crime. One advantage of working with an attorney is that we can discuss what facts to highlight that show you have been rehabilitated.

Need Assistance? Speak with an Ohio Expungement Attorney

Expungement is not a slam dunk, and many people are denied. Contact a lawyer at Groth & Associates today to discuss your case. Our consultations are free.

chapter 11 bankruptcy in Ohio

What Is Chapter 11 Bankruptcy?

By | Bankruptcy, Ohio, Toledo | No Comments

A Chapter 11 bankruptcy is one of the least common bankruptcy types for individuals to file. In fact, when most people think about bankruptcy, they think about Chapter 7 or Chapter 13 bankruptcy–the two most common types of bankruptcy for individuals to file. Most of the time, only businesses, such as corporations, limited liability corporations (LLCs), and partnerships are the ones to file for Chapter 11 bankruptcy, although in some cases, individuals may file if other options aren’t available. At the law offices of Groth & Associates, our Chapter 11 bankruptcy attorneys can answer your questions and guide you through the process of filing.

What Is a Chapter 11 Bankruptcy?

A Chapter 11 bankruptcy is often referred to as reorganization bankruptcy, as it is used by businesses (and, as mentioned above, sometimes individuals) to restructure debts. Many companies have used Chapter 11 to file for bankruptcy and restructure their debts in the past, including some of the most successful companies today, such as United Airlines and General Motors. 

How it Works

When a business is insolvent, they may file for a Chapter 11 bankruptcy. With the help of the bankruptcy court, the business may restructure its debts. This involves the business suggesting a reorganization plan; in order for the court to approve it, the plan must be in the best interests of the creditors to whom the business is indebted. While the business has the option of suggesting a reorganization plan, if they do not do so, the creditors can work together to create one. 

Usually, a business will continue to operate during the bankruptcy process. Only in special circumstances, such as in the case of fraud, will a bankruptcy trustee be appointed to run the business while the bankruptcy is pending; otherwise, the business will have control of their operations as normal.

Pros and Cons of Chapter 11 Bankruptcy

There are some downsides and advantages to filing for Chapter 11 bankruptcy. One benefit of filing for bankruptcy, in general, is that filing for bankruptcy initiatives the automatic stay. Another benefit is that it allows a business to continue operating; for individuals, reorganization bankruptcy can provide a clear path forward to escape financial woes. There are also some downsides, too. One major downside is that the Chapter 7 bankruptcy process is longer and more complex than other types of bankruptcy filings. It can also be difficult to negotiate a reorganization plan. 

Call Our Experienced Attorneys Today to Learn More

Whether as a business or an individual, filing for bankruptcy may be the best option if large amounts of debt are making financial independence impossible. At the law offices of Groth & Associates, our experienced attorneys know how difficult dealing with large amounts of debt is. If you are thinking about bankruptcy, we can help. Filing for Chapter 11 bankruptcy may be a viable option for you. Call our team today to learn more about how we can help.

How Long Do You Have to Make a Claim After a Car Accident?

By | Car Accident, Car Accident Injuries, Ohio, Toledo | No Comments

Being in a car accident is a terrifying experience. What’s more, if your injuries are serious, you may be unable to take immediate action to file a claim right after your crash happens; instead, you may be incapacitated for days, weeks, or months. While the best strategy is always to bring forth a claim as soon as possible after a crash if you are unable to, here’s what you should know about how long you have to make a claim after a car accident–

Check Your Insurance Policy

As stated above, it is always within your best interests to bring forth a claim as soon as possible after a crash. And this isn’t just because that’s when evidence is the freshest–it’s also because the insurance company may have rules and regulations in place for how long you have to file a claim before it’s denied. Insurance companies have a right to investigate a claim and, if too much time passes, this right is impeded. It’s important that you review your policy and familiarize yourself with the rules for providing your insurance company with notice.

Know the Statute of Limitations

You’ll need to provide the insurance company with notice of your claim within the required amount of time. However, if you want to file a lawsuit against the at-fault party in Ohio, you’ll likely have a little bit more time. That’s because your right to file a lawsuit is regulated by the state’s statute of limitations, which is found under Ohio Revised Code Section 2305.10. The statute reads that a person who suffers a personal injury–such as injuries sustained in a car accident–has two years from the date of the accident to file a claim for damages. 

If you wait longer than two years to file your lawsuit, then your right to recover is forfeited. Similarly, if you don’t provide the insurance company with notice of your accident within the required time frame (per your policy), then they may have cause to deny your claim. 

How to Protect Your Rights After a Car Accident

As stated earlier, it can be very difficult to take action after a car crash, both because you may be seriously injured and also because you may be emotionally scarred. However, time matters, and there are few exceptions to the limits that exist for making a claim after a car accident. In order to help you meet these time requirements, and to advocate for your right for your full damages amount and assist you in a number of other ways, working with a skilled attorney is strongly recommended. 

Call Groth & Associates Today

If you’ve been in a car crash, our Ohio car accident lawyers can start working on your case immediately. We will investigate your claim, ensure that all parties are notified in a timely manner, gather evidence, build your claim, and negotiate your settlement. To learn more about how we can assist you when you’ve been in a crash, as well as how to ensure that you don’t breach the statute of limitations, please call our legal team today.

how many times can you file for bankruptcy

How Often Can You File for Bankruptcy?

By | Bankruptcy, Ohio, Toledo | No Comments

Filing for bankruptcy is a huge decision. It’s also one that will have an effect on your credit score and financial health for years to come. While most people who file for bankruptcy aim to never do so again, things happen, and you may experience another financial emergency at some point in your life. If you have previously filed for bankruptcy and are considering doing so again, here’s what you should know about how often filing for bankruptcy is allowed. 

How Often Can You File for Bankruptcy?

You can actually file for bankruptcy as many times and as often as you’d like–there’s no penalty for doing so. However, the primary reason that debtors file for bankruptcy–to receive a discharge of their debts–cannot be pursued without limit. While you may be able to file for bankruptcy as often as you’d like, you can only receive a discharge of your debts after a certain amount of time has passed between your last discharge. 

What You Should Know About Bankruptcy Discharges

The amount of time that must pass between one bankruptcy discharge and another depends on the type of bankruptcy for which you’re filing and the type of bankruptcy for which you filed previously. For example…

If you’re filing for a Chapter 13 bankruptcy and you previously filed for a Chapter 7 bankruptcy, you will need to wait four years from the time that your debt was originally discharged until your current debts can be discharged. If you’re filing for Chapter 7 bankruptcy and previously filed for Chapter 13 bankruptcy, you’ll need to wait six years between discharges. Chapter 7 to Chapter 7 is an eight-year wait time, and Chapter 13 to Chapter 13 is only two years

I Need Debt Relief Now–What Should I Do?

For many people who are drowning in debt, the idea of having to wait another year, let alone another two, four, or six years, to file for bankruptcy and receive a discharge of their debts can be terrifying. If you need debt relief now, it’s best to talk to an attorney or a financial professional who can review your options and provide you with qualified advice. While you may not be able to file for bankruptcy and receive a discharge as often as you’d like, other options include:

  • Consolidating your debt;
  • Working out a payment plan with creditors;
  • Refinancing your mortgage;
  • Modifying your loan terms;
  • Creating a financial plan; 
  • Liquidating assets to pay creditors; and
  • More.

Our Attorneys Can Help

At the law office of Groth & Associates, we understand that debt is more than burdensome–it’s terrifying. If you are thinking about filing for bankruptcy but have already filed for bankruptcy in the past, it’s smart to talk to an attorney to discuss your options. To schedule a free consultation with our experienced bankruptcy lawyers, please send us a message using the intake form on our website or call us directly. Our law firm is here to provide you with sound legal advice and representation.

cost of divorce in Ohio

Who Pays for a Divorce in Ohio?

By | Divorce, Ohio, Toledo | No Comments

Getting a divorce is not only an emotional undertaking but also a financially taxing one. Indeed, even if your divorce is resolved quickly and without much conflict, there will still be some fees and costs incurred during the process, including filing fees, court fees, and attorneys’ fees. The longer your divorce drags on for and the more contested it is, the more expensive that it will be.

Some couples wind up spending tens of thousands of dollars on their divorce. If you’re getting a divorce, it’s important to have an understanding of the various costs that you’re likely to incur throughout the process and who may be responsible for paying for them. Here’s what you should know–

Costs in a Divorce

The costs that you incur during a divorce will depend on how long your divorce takes to settle, whether or not your divorce is contested or uncontested, how much you spend on outside costs (such as experts’ fees), and how much your divorce attorney charges. For obvious reasons, the more complex your divorce case is and the longer it takes to settle, the more expensive it will be. 

Common costs that are associated with a divorce include:

  • Attorneys’ fees;
  • Divorce filing fees;
  • Fees for expert witnesses, private investigator services, etc.;
  • Court reporter fees during deposition;
  • Fees associated with acquiring and copying documents; and
  • More.

You might also incur fees in the form of conciliatory services, such as court-ordered mediation or family therapy costs. 

Who Pays for Costs in a Divorce?

Going into an Ohio divorce, it’s best to assume that you’ll pay for your own costs associated with the divorce, and your spouse will pay for their own costs. For example, you’ll pay your own lawyer and they’ll pay theirs; you’ll pay for any expert services you hire, and they’ll pay for theirs, etc. However, there may be shared costs in a divorce, such as the costs of court-ordered mediation. What’s more, one spouse may be much more financially able to afford the costs of a divorce than the other, leading to inequity in the process. When this is the case, the court may order one spouse to pay for some or all of the other’s legal fees associated with a divorce. For example, if one partner in the relationship is the primary breadwinner for the family and is ordered to pay ongoing spousal maintenance to the other, this spouse may also be ordered to pay for the other’s attorney and other legal fees during the divorce. 

Contact a Divorce Attorney to Learn More

If you have questions about paying for a divorce and whether or not you will be responsible for paying for your spouse’s legal fees or whether your spouse may be ordered to pay for yours, it’s best to speak to an attorney. Having a firm understanding of how much a divorce may cost as you enter the divorce process is strongly recommended, regardless of who may end up paying for it.

To learn more about getting a divorce in Ohio and the services offered by our experienced Ohio divorce lawyers, please call Groth & Associates today or send us a message requesting a consultation.

What is the Means Test in Bankruptcy?

By | Bankruptcy, Ohio, Toledo | No Comments

If you’re considering filing for Chapter 7 bankruptcy, you probably already know that a key benefit of the process is emerging debt-free and getting a fresh start. If you qualify, you can wipe out credit cards, medical bills, and other unsecured debt, while also enjoying an automatic stay against creditors seeking payment. However, there are strict rules associated with Chapter 7 bankruptcy. One of the most important is the “means test,” which assesses your income as a determining factor for purposes of eligibility.

There’s more to the Chapter 7 means test than a simple dollar amount, as bankruptcy courts will evaluate multiple factors and apply them to your unique situation. For this reason, retaining a Toledo bankruptcy attorney is crucial. You might also find it helpful to review some of the basics.

Purpose of the Means Test:

Though there are drawbacks in terms of your credit rating, the benefits of filing Chapter 7 bankruptcy are significant for the individual who files. When the process concludes, you have opportunities to build good credit without the burden of overwhelming debt. For many people dealing with interest and late fees they can’t pay off, bankruptcy is a smart financial move. The means test was implemented to prevent high wage earners from eliminating their debts when they do have the ability. In short, if you make too much, you’re not eligible for Chapter 7.

Eligibility Rules:

According to US Bankruptcy Code regulations, there are two factors for determining whether you qualify for Chapter 7 according to the means test:

  1. If your current monthly earnings are under the threshold median income for Ohio, you pass the means test. The amount is based upon your household size and how many people contribute financially. You can file for Chapter 7.
  2. When your monthly household income exceeds the threshold amount, your disposable income is the focus. To calculate the amount, refer to what you earn and subtract allowable expenses. Examples include housing costs, utilities, food, and other necessities. If it’s possible to pay some of your unsecured debts, you may NOT qualify under the means test.

Pass-Fail on the Chapter 7 Bankruptcy Means Test:

For individuals who aren’t eligible under the rules regarding the means test, Chapter 13 might be an option. Repayment is the objective of the process, though you may not have to pay the full amount that you owe creditors. There are additional advantages of filing Chapter 13 if you want to retain assets that would otherwise be liquidated in Chapter 7.

Get Additional Details from a Toledo, OH Bankruptcy Lawyer

The Chapter 7 means test is just of many complicated laws involved with the bankruptcy process, so it’s wise to work with an experienced attorney who can assist with your matter. Our team at Groth & Associates is dedicated to helping clients look forward to a brighter financial future through bankruptcy, so please contact us to set up a consultation. You can reach our Toledo, OH office by calling 419.482.1176 or visiting our website.

Which Dogs Tend to Bite the Most?

By | Ohio, Personal Injury, Toledo | No Comments

Dogs rank high among America’s favorite pets, but not all of these canines are friendly. Dog bite statistics from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reveal that more than 344,000 people seek emergency medical treatment for injuries every year. Victims are devastated by physical pain, but the emotional and financial implications can be just as extreme. Ohio laws do provide you with options if you were hurt in an animal attack, but it’s difficult to know what to do because of the complicated laws regarding liability.

If you were injured under such circumstances, your first priority should be retaining a Toledo dog bite lawyer who will strive to recover monetary damages for your losses. Some information about the types of dogs that tend to bite may also help you understand the risks.

Statistics on Dog Bites by Breed

There’s no absolute test for what dog breeds are dangerous, so much analysis focuses on the frequency and extent of the harm for the human victim. Data indicates that Chihuahuas, Papillion, and Lhasa Apso breeds are the most likely to bite. However, the dog breeds that are most likely to cause serious, scarring injuries are:

  • Pit bulls;
  • Bulldogs;
  • German and Australian Shepherds;
  • Bull terriers;
  • Rottweilers;
  • Pinschers; and,
  • Mixed breeds.

Liability in Ohio Dog Bite Claims

Ohio is one of several US states that follows the strict liability theory for dog bite injuries. A victim who suffers a bite or any other type of injury can pursue the animal’s owner for damages without the legal requirement of showing fault. This rule is different from other jurisdictions where it’s necessary to show that the dog had bitten or showed other types of aggression in the past. Still, there are other theories of liability in dog bite claims, such as:

  • Negligence, if the dog’s owner failed to exercise a reasonable amount of care in controlling the animal; and,
  • Negligence per se, where the owner violated a law related to securing, handling, or leashing. Many Ohio counties and local governments have enacted statutes on these issues.

Compensation in Ohio Dog Bite Cases

The losses for a dog bite victim extend beyond the physical pain, since there are often emotional implications. Whether your claim proceeds according to statutory law or negligence concepts, you may qualify to recover a wide range of monetary damages. Examples include:

  • Medical costs for treatment, including emergency care, hospitalization, surgery, and related expenses;
  • Costs for psychiatric and/or psychological treatment;
  • Lost wages;
  • Scarring and disfigurement; and,
  • Many more.

Speak to a Toledo, OH Dog Bite Attorney About Your Rights

At Groth & Associates, our lawyers know that an animal attack is scary and carries many more losses than you might expect. We’re dedicated to assisting you with the claims process to get the compensation you deserve under Ohio law, including medical costs, pain, and suffering. To learn more about your options, please contact our office in Toledo. You can schedule a free consultation by calling 419.482.1176 or filling out on our online request form.

COVID-19 NOTICE:

We are OPEN: we use email, phone and video conferencing to serve our clients remotely

X